National and State-Specific Estimates of Settings of Receiving Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Among Adolescents in the United States

This study draws on data from the 2018 National Immunization Survey–Teen (NIS–Teen) to evaluate settings of receiving human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among adolescents in order to understand what strategies are needed to improve vaccination uptake. Doctor’s offices were the most common medical setting in which adolescents aged 13–17 years were vaccinated against HPV. In nonmedical settings, less than 1% of adolescents were immunized. To improve HPV vaccination coverage among adolescents, more work with medical and nonmedical settings is needed to identify and implement appropriate strategies.

Purpose

Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in the United States has been recommended for girls since 2006 and for boys since 2011. However, settings of receiving HPV vaccination have not been assessed. The purpose of this study is to assess settings of receiving HPV vaccination among adolescents in order to understand what strategies are needed to improve vaccination uptake.

Methods

Data from the 2018 National Immunization Survey–Teen (NIS–Teen) were analyzed to assess place of HPV vaccination overall, and by gender, quarter, and other selected variables among adolescents in the United States. The 2016–2018 NIS–Teen data were combined to assess state-specific place of HPV vaccination.

Results

Among vaccinated adolescents aged 13–17 years, a doctor’s office was the most common place where HPV vaccination was received (79.2%), followed by clinics, health centers, or other medical facilities (13.5%), health department (4.1%), hospital or emergency room (2.3%), schools (.5%), and pharmacies or stores (.4%). Overall, 99.1% of adolescents aged 13–17 years received HPV vaccination at medical settings and only .9% at nonmedical settings. Reported vaccination in nonmedical settings by state ranged from less than .1% in Delaware, Florida, and New Hampshire to 4.1% in North Dakota, with a median of 1.0%.

Conclusions

Doctor’s offices were the most common medical setting for adolescents to receive HPV vaccination. Less than 1% of adolescents received vaccination at nonmedical settings. Continuing work with medical and nonmedical settings to identify and implement appropriate strategies are needed to improve HPV vaccination coverage among adolescents.
Masters of Pediatrics™ (MoP) is dedicated to the advancement of healthcare technologies and education serving as the academic home for child health professionals. Masters of Pediatrics offers continuing medical education, activities, and training through its advanced education entity Metabolic Medical Institute (MMI).
A division of Tarsus Medical owned by Tarsus Group
About

+1 (888) 555-1212

Copyright © 2021, A4M. All trademarks, registered or unregistered, are the property of their respective owners.

Latest RESEARCH & DATA